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Guantanamo Wi-Fi Cut Off after Anonymous Threat

Guantanamo Bay Naval Base shut down its wireless connection to bar prisoners from accessing the Internet. Inmates are also denied access to their social networking accounts on Twitter and Facebook, after Anonymous made public its plans to “shut down Guantanamo” to mark the 100th day of inmates’ hunger strike.

Army Lt. Col. Samuel House told Associated Press “the precautions were taken because of online threats to disrupt activities at the base allegedly made by the international hacking group Anonymous. No disruptions have been reported so far.”

The hacktivist group took great interest in recent hunger strikes at Guantanamo and decided to help the inmates’ cause by “raising awareness in social media of the human rights violations going on at Guantanamo, the indefinite detention of prisoners, many of whom have been cleared for release years ago.”

According to the military sources, 103 of the 166 inmates were on a hunger strike that went on for 100 days. Some of the protesters are force fed which is against the United States human rights.

Anonymous urged computer users worldwide to protest the prison’s conditions with “twitter storms, email bombs, and fax bombs.”

Cutting the Wi-Fi Internet network of Guantanamo Bay Naval Base is a precautionary solution since no attack against the base has been registered to date. The Net connection will, however, remain down indefinitely.

About The Author

E-Threat Analyst

A blend of teacher and technical journalist with a pinch of e-threat analysis, Loredana Botezatu writes mostly about malware and spam. She believes that most errors happen between the keyboard and the chair. Loredana has been writing about the IT world and e-security for well over five years and has made a personal goal out of educating computer users about the ins and outs of the cybercrime ecosystem.

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