Industry News

Companies Pay $6,500 an Hour to Recover from DDoS Attacks

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Companies pay $6,500 an hour to recover from a DDoS attack and up to $3,000 a day to mitigate and recover from malware infections, according to a report by Solutionary. The security service provider said that sophisticated malware, DDoS attacks, the BYOD trend and Web application security are the top four threats that concern organizations.

Companies Pay $6,500 an Hour to Recover from DDoS Attacks The costs of cyber-attack recovery, based on real-world cases, include investing in new technologies, hiring extra personnel, third-party consultants and incident response teams. The figures could be a lot higher if lost productivity, downtime after DDoS attacks, and lost revenue were taken into consideration.

“Cyber criminals are targeting organizations with advanced threats and attacks designed to siphon off valuable corporate IP and regulated information, deny online services to millions of users and damage brand reputation,” Solutionary Chief Security Strategist Don Gray said.

The firm also found that Java has surpassed Adobe PDF as the most-targeted application. Nearly 40 percent of all analyzed exploits were based on Java vulnerabilities. Almost 45 percent of malware attack attempts targeted financial customers, while 35 percent went after retail customers.

Research also revealed US organizations face greater risk from domestic e-threats, with 83 percent of cyber-attacks against American companies coming from US-based IP addresses. Almost a quarter of US organizations hacked by co-nationals were governmental agencies.

About the author

Bianca STANESCU

Bianca Stanescu, the fiercest warrior princess in the Bitdefender news palace, is a down-to-earth journalist, who's always on to a cybertrendy story. She's the industry news guru, who'll always keep a close eye on the AV movers and shakers and report their deeds from a fresh new perspective. Proud mother of one, she covers parental control topics, with a view to valiantly cutting a safe path for children through the Internet thicket. She likes to let words and facts speak for themselves.

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  • […] We’ve all heard of a distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack and know what it is: when a person or people attempt to take down a Web site by flooding it with connection requests. These max out the site’s bandwidth, making it unable to accept new requests. The attacks are usually automated and can be accomplished in a variety of ways. The loss of traffic during the attack itself, and the recovery afterward, can end up costing Web sites quite a lot. […]

  • […] We’ve all heard of a distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack and know what it is: when a person or people attempt to take down a Web site by flooding it with connection requests. These max out the site’s bandwidth, making it unable to accept new requests. The attacks are usually automated and can be accomplished in a variety of ways. The loss of traffic during the attack itself, and the recovery afterward, can end up costing Web sites quite a lot. […]

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  • […] We’ve all heard of a distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack and know what it is: when a person or people attempt to take down a Web site by flooding it with connection requests. These max out the site’s bandwidth, making it unable to accept new requests. The attacks are usually automated and can be accomplished in a variety of ways. The loss of traffic during the attack itself, and the recovery afterward, can end up costing Web sites quite a lot. […]

  • […] We’ve all heard of a distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack and know what it is: when a person or people attempt to take down a Web site by flooding it with connection requests. These max out the site’s bandwidth, making it unable to accept new requests. The attacks are usually automated and can be accomplished in a variety of ways. The loss of traffic during the attack itself, and the recovery afterward, can end up costing Web sites quite a lot. […]